What the passing of the CT pre-election measure means


People vote on Tuesday, November 8, 2022 at the Crystal Ballroom in New Britain, Connecticut. Photo by Jessica Hill/AP Photo.

As the results of the 2022 midterm elections continue to roll in, the ballot question to implement early voting in Connecticut has passed.

The passing of this issue means it is one step closer to approval at the state legislative level. If passed there, some form of early voting will become part of the voting process in Connecticut.

Early voting will allow more people to vote based on their convenience, said Thomas Hayes, an associate professor of political science at the University of Connecticut.

“The benefits of early voting are that it reduces the costs imposed on voters when they vote,” Hayes said. “In Connecticut, voting is only on election day. It’s a work day and the lines are long. Voting may not be convenient for many people.”

[Text Wrapping Break]The American Civil Liberties Union of Connecticut is a branch of the national ACLU organization dedicated to government affairs.

The organization’s focus on getting Connecticut’s early voting issue highlighted the benefits it would bring to minority groups in U.S. democracy, said Jess Zaccagnino, policy adviser to the ACLU of Connecticut.

“Early voting helps Connecticut voters who are busy,” Zaccagnino said. “A study showed that black voters wait, on average, nine minutes longer than white voters.”

“Early voting helps Connecticut voters who are busy. A study showed that black voters wait, on average, nine minutes longer than white voters.”

Jess Zaccagnino, Connecticut ACLU Political Council.

In preparation for the midterm elections, the Connecticut ACLU has made it its mission to raise awareness of the importance of this question on Connecticut’s ballot.

“We formed a pack this election season that allowed us to work on voting issues like early voting. However, we are still bipartisan and do not support any candidates.”

Although Connecticut is currently considered a primarily blue state, Hayes highlighted that it has not always voted primarily Democratic as a reason Connecticut is one of four states not currently having early voting.

“Connecticut wasn’t always a democratic state, Republicans had more power at different times, so certain laws didn’t get passed,” Hayes said.

Hayes also identified the groups he believes an early vote in Connecticut will have the most positive impact.

“Early voting will help young people, full-time workers and the working class,” Hayes said. “Minorized voters also tend to have to wait the longest because the queues in the cities tend to be longer.”

“Early voting will help young people, full-time workers and the working class. Minorized voters also tend to have to wait the longest because the queues in cities tend to be longer.”

Thomas Hayes, associate professor of political science at the University of Connecticut.

Along with allowing more people to vote, Hayes pointed out how early voting could reflect a positive image of democracy for voters.

“Probably more groups will come out to vote and more people will be in favor of the democratic process in the US,” Hayes said.

The passage of the early voting measure by Connecticut voters is a positive sign, Zaccagnino said. She hopes the issue will continue to be passed and eventually become law for future elections.

“I’m pretty confident it will pass, I don’t want to hex anything. But it’s up to us to keep the pressure on in the capital, which I will do every day, said Zaccagnino.”

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